Archives for December 2019

Dr Adwoa Danso is finding new ways to reach communities where some health topics are taboo

Profile – Dr Adwoa Danso

Roles – Full-time locum GP in Essex and east London; resident doctor on GN Radio UK, including as host of The Medical Show with Dr Danso; founder of The Clinic Diaries online platform; executive at the Ghanaian Doctors and Dentists Association UK (GDDA UK)

Hours worked – Eight to 10 NHS sessions and additional work

Saturday

I’m filming a women’s health series for The Clinic Diaries, my YouTube channel. It’s good to vary themes – this one follows the success of a male-focused series. Other episodes have covered pregnancy, contraception and the impact of social media on mental health.

We film at my home (it’s more relaxed that way), joined by family and friends or special guests such as activists or other healthcare professionals.

The group format enables everyone to share a variety of views. Our audience is mainly black and minority ethnic women, and we discuss issues affecting them and women in general, such as the pressure to have children, and a recent report stating black women are more likely than white women to die during childbirth.

Afterwards, I oversee my producer Sarah in editing the footage, before we release the episodes on YouTube.

Sunday

Weekdays are largely taken up with clinical sessions, so I use Sundays to prepare for my weekly radio show for the Ghanaian community in the UK – typically by reading the newest medical guidelines and the healthcare sections of newspapers – plus Pulse, of course.

I decide the topic the week before, and tell listeners in advance. This time, I’m focusing on menstrual problems. Next is chronic kidney disease. I generally choose issues common in this community; we have covered malaria treatment, hypertension and fertility concerns.

Unfortunately, many medical subjects are taboo in Ghanaian culture, mainly because of deep-rooted spiritual beliefs. This can make it difficult for people to seek help, so I’m proud of how the radio show helps to tackle these barriers.

My co-host, Stanley, is a pro at facilitating discourse. As he doesn’t have a medical background, I brief him with basic clinical information. His lay input brings a fresh perspective, raising points that audiences might be curious about.

Monday

In the evening, I have a conference call with the other executives at the Ghanaian Doctors and Dentists Association UK.

We’re organising our annual conference and gala, which will be fundraising for obstetric fistula support in Ghana. There are plenty of details to consider, from sending VIP invitations to selling raffle tickets.

Tuesday AM

Tuesday is the highlight of every week. After a busy surgery, I head to the GN Radio headquarters in Oval, south London for the weekly show.

I get there early to catch up on local news, checking for anything that is timely for our listeners, who are mostly of Ghanaian origin. Stanley is on hand again, setting up cameras to stream the show to Facebook. This is a key part of our engagement, allowing listeners to submit questions while we’re on air.

Tuesday PM

Before long, we are broadcasting. Our topic is the impact of heavy periods on a woman’s life and there’s plenty to discuss – sick days off work, relationship problems, period poverty and being ostracised by some communities.

I ask how much a pack of sanitary towels costs in Ghana. A Facebook user quickly responds: it’s 6 cedis – roughly £1. For context, the Ghanaian living wage is 900 cedis per month – around £135.

I aim to advise on the issues we explore but stress that, despite hosting a medical show, I’m not a replacement for listeners’ own GPs, and won’t offer personal advice. They’re generally respectful of this, and are always engaging and keen to discover more. One enquires about the Mirena coil – how it’s fitted, whether the process is painful and the estimated recovery time. Another wants me to debunk myths about fibroidectomy. I try to answer all questions, then recap the key points for those who tune in late.

Towards the end, I reiterate that more information can be found on my social media accounts – @ClinicDiaries on Twitter and TheClinicDiaries on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. Tuesday evenings whiz by, and I’m always left inspired after a productive show.

Throughout the week, I keep an eye out for queries or specific areas to pay attention to, ready to do it all over again.

Source:http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/

Sena Dagadu ft. Worlasi – ‘If you no dey like me’

Ghanaian-Hungarian songstress/rapper, Sena Dagadu, has unveiled the video for her latest track ‘If you no dey like me’.

The song, off the Wings EP, featured Ghanaian multi-talented artiste Worlasi.

The music video shot in a kitchen setting is directed by The Ghalileo Effects.

Born in Accra to a Hungarian mother and a Ghanaian father, she’s been active since 2001 and is a lead vocalist of Hungarian alternative band Irie Mafia.

Sena combines influences from hip-hop, reggae, funk, rock, among others, and has released multiple critically-received albums including Lots Of Trees, Grow Slow, First One, Azdanê, Natural High, Take a Look, Only Solution Remix, Vol. 1, DA 1 YAH EP 03, and Feathers.

She has also been associated with top Ghanaian acts including hiplife grandpapa Reggie Rockstone, VVIP, FOKN Bois’ M3nsa and Wanlov, as well as the fast-rising Worlasi.

LIFESTYLE: 15 simple romantic gestures that truly say ‘I love you’

Sometimes, simply saying “I love you” is not enough.

It doesn’t always take a grandiose declaration of love to get your message across. Most of the time, it’s those little somethings and sweet nothings that help you stay connected for the long haul.

Need romantic ideas? The 15 romantic gestures below are just a few examples of everyday actions that mean the world to someone you’re in love with. You can learn how to be romantic by doing just a few of these, and showing your partner you care.

1. Help whittle down their to-do list.
Pick up her dry cleaning, stock his fridge with a week’s worth of groceries, clean her bathroom, frame the poster that’s been sitting in the corner of his living room since you met. After all, it’s tough to be romantic with all those tasks hanging over your head.

2. Slip a sweet note into their gym bag.
What better workout motivation is there than a reminder of how much you care?

3. Make them feel at home.
If you and your significant other live apart, make an effort to stock your place with specific items — food, shampoo, etc. — that he or she likes. It makes your place feel more like home.

4. Send a postcard or love letter in the mail.
Emails are easy come, easy go. Snail mail packs a punch, especially when it’s not a bill.

5. Share your feelings through music.
Make them a sweet mixtape or playlist of songs that make you crazy about them!

6. Make breakfast.
It doesn’t have to be in bed. It doesn’t even have to be anything fancy. Heart-shaped pancakes are easy!

7. Recreate your first date.
Go to the same place, order the same drinks, and so on. Reminisce about your first impressions of your partner and some of the best, most exciting things that have happened in your relationship since then.

8. Display a sentimental snapshot.
Instead of keeping an awesome photo of the two of you on your phone or Facebook wall, print a copy and frame it. Put it somewhere your partner will see it every day.

9. Make the bed.
After you spend the night together, tuck the sheets in, fluff the pillows, and make it extra neat so it’s relaxing to get back into later.

10. Help simplify their day.
Maybe he’s been using the same broken umbrella for a year, or she’s always misplacing her keys. Buy something to solve this little problem, like a top-of-the-line umbrella in his favorite color or a keychain that beeps when she whistles for it.

11. Suggest doing something they want to do.
Think of a restaurant, outing, movie — something that you know is right up his alley — and suggest it before he or she can bring it up.

12. Compliment them in front of other people.
It doesn’t just feel good for both of you — it also inspires other people.

13. Hold hands.
Even if you’re just watching TV at home. Touch is an easy and powerful gift you can give almost anywhere, in various stages of dress.

14. Make a list.
Post a list of three things you love about her on her Facebook wall, or send it out into the Twittersphere.

15. Make a vow to always greet each other in a loving way.
This is especially important after you’ve been apart. Even if it feels a little silly at first, it’ll help you and your partner keep the butterflies alive.

Stars celebrate Avicii at emotional tribute concert

Stars including Rita Ora, Adam Lambert and David Guetta have played a charity tribute concert in honour of the late Swedish DJ Avicii.

Avicii, whose real name was Tim Bergling, was found dead in Oman in April 2018, at the age of 28.

His family said at the time he was a perfectionist who struggled with stress and “could not go on any longer”.

Proceeds from the concert will go to mental health and suicide prevention charities.

It opened on an emotional note, with thousands of fans lighting up Stockholm’s Friends Arena with their phones; as Swedish singer Sandro Cavazzo performed his Avicii collaboration Without You.

The song’s poignant lyrics – “I’ve gotta learn how to love without you” – have become a eulogy for the DJ in the wake of his death; with the single returning to the top of the charts in his home country.

Embellished by mournful strings, Cavazzo’s sensitive delivery set the tone for the concert, which carefully balanced commemoration and celebration.

As the song ended, she formed her hands into a heart symbol in tribute to Avicii.

After leaving the stage, she posted a heartfelt note on Instagram, saying: “I want to thank Avicii’s family for organising this [concert] to raise awareness for mental health especially within the music industry.

“Often success can be seen as a representation that someone is also doing well mentally, however we can see here that there is sooo much more work to be done.”

Prince Carl Philip and Princess Sofia of Sweden were among the 60,000-strong audience for the show, which was streamed live on YouTube and Facebook.

A parade of Avicii’s friends and collaborators graced the stage, including Adam Lambert, Michelle Gonzalez, Agnes Carlsson, Kygo and Belgian DJ Dimitri Vegas.

Aloe Blacc, who scored a worldwide hit with Avicii on the dance-country crossover Wake Me Up, was among those paying tribute.

‘Wake-up call’

“Every generation has its icon and heroes who break convention to capture hearts and minds,” he said. “Our friend Tim Bergling was one of those bright, shining stars.

“Through his music, he shared his joy, his pain and his passion, and I witnessed his brilliance first hand.

“I trusted him and I believed in his artistic vision, and in a short time I would see the tremendous impact our collaboration would have on the world. It changed my life forever. Thank you, Tim.”

Dance producer David Guetta called Avicii’s death “a wake-up call for our community”.

Musicians, whether they’re DJs, pop stars or rock bands “push [themselves] constantly and it never stops,” he explained to Rolling Stone ahead of the concert.

“You always need to deliver constantly. It’s very difficult and the expectations, when you’ve reached the top, are huge, and so many people depend on you.”

The star said he had cut back his touring commitments after Avicii died, restricting himself to no more than 100 shows per year.

Aloe Blacc
Image captionAloe Blacc performed Wake Me Up and SOS – a posthumously-released song that addressed Avicii’s struggles
David Guetta
Image captionDavid Guetta said Avicii’s death had made him prioritise his own mental wellbeing
Fans at the Avicii tribute concert
Image captionFans lit up Stockholm’s Friends Arena to memorialise the star
Prince Carl Philip and Princess Sofia of Sweden were among the 60,000-strong audience
Image captionPrince Carl Philip and Princess Sofia of Sweden were among the 60,000-strong audience

The concert ended with an extended, valedictory version of Avicii’s signature song, Levels, as the arena lit up with fireworks and laser beams. Some of the crowd danced through the sadness, others stood silently in tears.

As the club beats faded into a melancholy orchestral coda, home videos of the late DJ flashed across the screen, lingering on a final, still image before fading to black.

In a statement, Avicii’s father, Klas Bergling, said the family had wanted the concert to put “the stigma surrounding mental illness and suicide” on the political agenda.

“Policies and tools are needed to detect the risks and prevent suicide, especially among young people,” he added.

“We are grateful that his friends, artists and musicians with whom he worked during his career have come to Stockholm to help us realise this tribute concert.”

Thomas Cook customers face refund delays

Customers of defunct tour operator Thomas Cook have reacted angrily after learning they will face delays in getting refunds for Atol-protected package holidays.

The Civil Aviation Authority originally said all valid claims made on the first day of its refund programme would be paid within 60 days, or by this Friday.

But now it says only two-thirds will be paid on time.

It said it had asked the remaining claimants for more information.

CAA boss Richard Moriarty acknowledged many would be worried about not getting their money back before Christmas.

“We thank consumers for their ongoing patience as we continue to do all that we can to work through the UK travel industry’s largest ever refunds programme,” he said.

“I appreciate that this is a concerning time for Thomas Cook customers who are waiting for their refunds, particularly at this time of the year.”

When Thomas Cook ceased trading on 23 September, anyone who had paid for a future Thomas Cook package holiday protected under the CAA’s Atol scheme was entitled to a full refund.

From 7 October an online refund application system opened, and customers were told the Civil Aviation Authority aimed to pay out within 60 days.

The CAA said it had received 67,000 claims on the first day, and two thirds would be paid by this weekend, bringing the total amount of compensation paid to date to £160m.

Saudi Aramco raises $25.6bn in world’s biggest share sale

State-owned oil giant Saudi Aramco has raised a record $25.6bn (£19.4bn) in its initial public offering in Riyadh.

The share sale was the biggest to date, surpassing that of China’s Alibaba which raised $25bn in 2014 in New York.

Aramco relied on domestic and regional investors to sell a 1.5% stake after lukewarm interest from abroad.

The IPO will value it at $1.7tn when trading begins – short of its $2tn target, but making it the most valuable listed company in the world.

The share sale is at the heart of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s plans to modernise the Saudi economy and wean it off its dependence on oil.

The country urgently needs tens of billions of dollars to fund megaprojects and develop new industries.

Aramco has found the journey to its public offering testing.

It initially sought to raise $100bn on two exchanges – with a first listing on the kingdom’s Tadawul bourse, and then another on an overseas exchange such as the London Stock Exchange.

But it scaled back its plans after foreign investors raised concerns about climate change, political risk and a lack of corporate transparency.

International institutions also baulked at the firm’s $1.7tn valuation, prompting Aramco to pull marketing roadshows in New York and London.

Instead, it focused its marketing efforts on Saudi investors and wealthy Gulf Arab allies. Saudi banks also offered citizens cheap credit to bid for the shares following a nationwide advertising campaign.

Shares were priced at 32 Saudi riyals ($8.53) on Thursday and were heavily oversubscribed, according to reports.

But it remains to be seen whether the share price rises or falls when trading begins, most likely later this month.

The IPO’s pricing came as Saudi Arabia met with Russia and other members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) in Vienna to discuss oil production.

The allies – who together pump 40% of the world’s oil – agreed to deepen output cuts as part of ongoing efforts to prop up global prices.

Oil prices collapsed in mid 2014 and have yet to fully recover, leaving oil-dependent economies under pressure.

The market is struggling with slower global growth and a flood of new production from countries such as the US.

Presentational grey line

A bigger challenge awaits

Sameer Hashmi, Middle East business correspondent

Three years after it was first announced Saudi Arabia is finally taking the world’s most profitable company public. The market valuation is less than the $2tn target that Crown Prince Bin-Salman – had initially hoped to achieve.

The company has committed to a large annual dividend until 2024 to ensure investors don’t sell shares in the near future leading to a drop in market valuation.

But analysts believe the biggest challenge for the company will be if it decides to list on an international stock exchange in the future to expand its investor pool. The core business of Saudi Aramco – oil – is considered by many experts its biggest risk.

Demand for crude has been falling, which could make it difficult for the company to grow in the long term. The climate crisis and geopolitical risks are also key factors that could deter potential investors.