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Protesting Safely: 20 Steps If You Want To Take Part

The violent death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old African American father living in Minnesota, USA, at the hands of a white policeman – who kneeled on his neck for nearly nine minutes as the life left his body – has lit a spark of protest across the world.

Amidst the pandemic, individuals have been sporting face masks and gathering to de-cry the systemic racism which led to the untimely death of Floyd, as well as of police brutality against Black communities.

This crime followed the high profile killings of Breonna Taylor and Tony McDade at the hands of the state, as well as of Ahmaud Arbery, who was killed by a white father and son while out jogging.

Demonstrations have happened and are planned across the UK, including at Parliament Square at 1pm on Saturday 6th June, and at the US embassy at 2pm, on Sunday 7th. Important note: a statement released via the official Black Lives Matter UK Twitter account has stated that this group are ‘not calling for protests,’ but will ‘support people to protest in a way that is safe for them as well as for our communities.’ (The protests are being organised under the #BLMLDN.)

Evidence from the Office of National Statistics suggests that Black people in England and Wales are four times as likely to die from COVID-19 than white people, making this concern a heavy one.

Right now, gathering en masse contravenes the rules of the novel coronavirus-necessitated lockdown. Of course, meeting in a crowd exposes yourself and others to the risk of contracting the virus. However, for some who are not isolating, this moment requires some hard decisions about navigating risk, while standing with communities demanding change around the world.

It’s also vital to know that arrests have been made in earlier solidarity demonstrations in London. If you do attend a protest, read up on what to do in the event that you are taken into custody ahead of time (Black Lives Matter UK have shared expert advice from legal pros, via Twitter.)

#BlackLivesMatterUK@ukblm

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Some arrests were made earlier at one of the #BLMLDN protests.
Here is some legal information put together by @GBCLegal
Read up and stay safe family.

View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter

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You also need to know about staying as safe as possible, as well as protecting those around you. To that end, NHS GP Dr Adwoa Danso (@theclinicdiaries), shares a list of advice.

7 practical things to remember if you’re suffering from coronavirus health anxiety

Coronavirus has catapulted the world into completely unchartered territory, and it’s scary times for all. With the UK government recommending social distancing, encouraging the whole population to avoid busy social places such as pubs, clubs, restaurants, and theatres, we’re facing a long road ahead of… well, not a lot.

And in that empty space, anxiety can manifest. Whether you’re someone who has long suffered from health anxiety, or if these are new feelings for you, it’s important to find coping mechanisms that help to calm you.

With that in mind, we asked GP Dr Adwoa Danso to share some useful, practical things to remember in these worrying times. If you find yourself spiralling, read through these pointers slowly, and remember that you are certainly not the only one experiencing this kind of fear.

1. Remember that it will pass

“The COVID-19 situation is changing rapidly but it is important to remember that the outbreak will pass,” says Dr Danso. “The majority of people will be unaffected or have mild symptoms which they will completely recover from.”

2. Be aware of the symptoms of stress

“And address them quickly by seeking help from your GP,” advises the doctor. Symptoms of stress can include “overindulging in alcohol and tobacco, having difficulty concentrating, and having a poor sleep pattern”.

3. Focus on the facts

This is a particularly important one, especially with social media facilitating all sorts of information flying about. “Not everyone is an expert,” reminds Dr Danso. “Use reputable sources such as WHO and Public Health England for your information.”ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

4. Talk

“Speaking to people you trust about any concerns helps a lot,” advises the GP. If your friends and family aren’t in the same household as you, utilise the extensive technology we’ve got at our disposal and have regular calls and FaceTimes.

5. Continue taking any prescribed medication from your GP

“Have a plan to obtain your medication if you are to self- isolate, to ensure you do not run out of medication,” reminds the doctor.

Antidepressants, mental health, medication

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6. Try to avoid feeling claustrophobic

During times of self-isolation and social distancing, it’s natural that the four walls around you might feel as though they’re closing in. “If you’re feeling cooped up, focus on hobbies you can do more of, such as cooking, reading and yoga,” suggests Dr Danso. What better time to crack into that 1,000 piece puzzle…

7. Focus on things you CAN do

Which are: “Follow medical advice, wash your hands and use sanitisers regularly, and avoid non-essential travel.”

Coronavirus, health anxiety

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The information in this story is accurate as of the publication date. While we are attempting to keep our content as up-to-date as possible, the situation surrounding the coronavirus pandemic continues to develop rapidly, so it’s possible that some information and recommendations may have changed since publishing. For any concerns and latest advice, visit the World Health Organisation. If you’re in the UK, the National Health Service can also provide useful information and support, while US users can contact the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr Adwoa Danso is finding new ways to reach communities where some health topics are taboo

Profile – Dr Adwoa Danso

Roles – Full-time locum GP in Essex and east London; resident doctor on GN Radio UK, including as host of The Medical Show with Dr Danso; founder of The Clinic Diaries online platform; executive at the Ghanaian Doctors and Dentists Association UK (GDDA UK)

Hours worked – Eight to 10 NHS sessions and additional work

Saturday

I’m filming a women’s health series for The Clinic Diaries, my YouTube channel. It’s good to vary themes – this one follows the success of a male-focused series. Other episodes have covered pregnancy, contraception and the impact of social media on mental health.

We film at my home (it’s more relaxed that way), joined by family and friends or special guests such as activists or other healthcare professionals.

The group format enables everyone to share a variety of views. Our audience is mainly black and minority ethnic women, and we discuss issues affecting them and women in general, such as the pressure to have children, and a recent report stating black women are more likely than white women to die during childbirth.

Afterwards, I oversee my producer Sarah in editing the footage, before we release the episodes on YouTube.

Sunday

Weekdays are largely taken up with clinical sessions, so I use Sundays to prepare for my weekly radio show for the Ghanaian community in the UK – typically by reading the newest medical guidelines and the healthcare sections of newspapers – plus Pulse, of course.

I decide the topic the week before, and tell listeners in advance. This time, I’m focusing on menstrual problems. Next is chronic kidney disease. I generally choose issues common in this community; we have covered malaria treatment, hypertension and fertility concerns.

Unfortunately, many medical subjects are taboo in Ghanaian culture, mainly because of deep-rooted spiritual beliefs. This can make it difficult for people to seek help, so I’m proud of how the radio show helps to tackle these barriers.

My co-host, Stanley, is a pro at facilitating discourse. As he doesn’t have a medical background, I brief him with basic clinical information. His lay input brings a fresh perspective, raising points that audiences might be curious about.

Monday

In the evening, I have a conference call with the other executives at the Ghanaian Doctors and Dentists Association UK.

We’re organising our annual conference and gala, which will be fundraising for obstetric fistula support in Ghana. There are plenty of details to consider, from sending VIP invitations to selling raffle tickets.

Tuesday AM

Tuesday is the highlight of every week. After a busy surgery, I head to the GN Radio headquarters in Oval, south London for the weekly show.

I get there early to catch up on local news, checking for anything that is timely for our listeners, who are mostly of Ghanaian origin. Stanley is on hand again, setting up cameras to stream the show to Facebook. This is a key part of our engagement, allowing listeners to submit questions while we’re on air.

Tuesday PM

Before long, we are broadcasting. Our topic is the impact of heavy periods on a woman’s life and there’s plenty to discuss – sick days off work, relationship problems, period poverty and being ostracised by some communities.

I ask how much a pack of sanitary towels costs in Ghana. A Facebook user quickly responds: it’s 6 cedis – roughly £1. For context, the Ghanaian living wage is 900 cedis per month – around £135.

I aim to advise on the issues we explore but stress that, despite hosting a medical show, I’m not a replacement for listeners’ own GPs, and won’t offer personal advice. They’re generally respectful of this, and are always engaging and keen to discover more. One enquires about the Mirena coil – how it’s fitted, whether the process is painful and the estimated recovery time. Another wants me to debunk myths about fibroidectomy. I try to answer all questions, then recap the key points for those who tune in late.

Towards the end, I reiterate that more information can be found on my social media accounts – @ClinicDiaries on Twitter and TheClinicDiaries on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. Tuesday evenings whiz by, and I’m always left inspired after a productive show.

Throughout the week, I keep an eye out for queries or specific areas to pay attention to, ready to do it all over again.

Source:http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/

Sena Dagadu ft. Worlasi – ‘If you no dey like me’

Ghanaian-Hungarian songstress/rapper, Sena Dagadu, has unveiled the video for her latest track ‘If you no dey like me’.

The song, off the Wings EP, featured Ghanaian multi-talented artiste Worlasi.

The music video shot in a kitchen setting is directed by The Ghalileo Effects.

Born in Accra to a Hungarian mother and a Ghanaian father, she’s been active since 2001 and is a lead vocalist of Hungarian alternative band Irie Mafia.

Sena combines influences from hip-hop, reggae, funk, rock, among others, and has released multiple critically-received albums including Lots Of Trees, Grow Slow, First One, Azdanê, Natural High, Take a Look, Only Solution Remix, Vol. 1, DA 1 YAH EP 03, and Feathers.

She has also been associated with top Ghanaian acts including hiplife grandpapa Reggie Rockstone, VVIP, FOKN Bois’ M3nsa and Wanlov, as well as the fast-rising Worlasi.

LIFESTYLE: 15 simple romantic gestures that truly say ‘I love you’

Sometimes, simply saying “I love you” is not enough.

It doesn’t always take a grandiose declaration of love to get your message across. Most of the time, it’s those little somethings and sweet nothings that help you stay connected for the long haul.

Need romantic ideas? The 15 romantic gestures below are just a few examples of everyday actions that mean the world to someone you’re in love with. You can learn how to be romantic by doing just a few of these, and showing your partner you care.

1. Help whittle down their to-do list.
Pick up her dry cleaning, stock his fridge with a week’s worth of groceries, clean her bathroom, frame the poster that’s been sitting in the corner of his living room since you met. After all, it’s tough to be romantic with all those tasks hanging over your head.

2. Slip a sweet note into their gym bag.
What better workout motivation is there than a reminder of how much you care?

3. Make them feel at home.
If you and your significant other live apart, make an effort to stock your place with specific items — food, shampoo, etc. — that he or she likes. It makes your place feel more like home.

4. Send a postcard or love letter in the mail.
Emails are easy come, easy go. Snail mail packs a punch, especially when it’s not a bill.

5. Share your feelings through music.
Make them a sweet mixtape or playlist of songs that make you crazy about them!

6. Make breakfast.
It doesn’t have to be in bed. It doesn’t even have to be anything fancy. Heart-shaped pancakes are easy!

7. Recreate your first date.
Go to the same place, order the same drinks, and so on. Reminisce about your first impressions of your partner and some of the best, most exciting things that have happened in your relationship since then.

8. Display a sentimental snapshot.
Instead of keeping an awesome photo of the two of you on your phone or Facebook wall, print a copy and frame it. Put it somewhere your partner will see it every day.

9. Make the bed.
After you spend the night together, tuck the sheets in, fluff the pillows, and make it extra neat so it’s relaxing to get back into later.

10. Help simplify their day.
Maybe he’s been using the same broken umbrella for a year, or she’s always misplacing her keys. Buy something to solve this little problem, like a top-of-the-line umbrella in his favorite color or a keychain that beeps when she whistles for it.

11. Suggest doing something they want to do.
Think of a restaurant, outing, movie — something that you know is right up his alley — and suggest it before he or she can bring it up.

12. Compliment them in front of other people.
It doesn’t just feel good for both of you — it also inspires other people.

13. Hold hands.
Even if you’re just watching TV at home. Touch is an easy and powerful gift you can give almost anywhere, in various stages of dress.

14. Make a list.
Post a list of three things you love about her on her Facebook wall, or send it out into the Twittersphere.

15. Make a vow to always greet each other in a loving way.
This is especially important after you’ve been apart. Even if it feels a little silly at first, it’ll help you and your partner keep the butterflies alive.