News

Running Up To December 2020 General Elections

Background

We are 5 (five) months away from the next general elections scheduled for 7th December 2020 and, as usual, the duopoly in Ghanaian political arena enjoyed by the National Democratic Congress (NDC) and the New Patriotic Party (NPP) is at a crescendo as far as new impressions to the electorate are concerned.

Together, these 2 main political parties have administered our country’s affairs for 42 (forty-two) years; NDC has ruled us for 27 years (including 11 years under PNDC, 8 years for Rawlings and 8 years for the late Prof. J E. Atta Mills and ex-President Mr. J. D Mahama. NPP has also ruled us for 15 years (including 3 years for the late Prime Minister, Prof. K. A Busia, 8 years for President J. A Kufuor and Nana Addo’s 4 years running up to December 2020).

Prior to the duopoly, Nkrumah and his CPP ruled Ghana for 9 (nine) years plus the 10 years of Military rules; NLC’s 3 years and National Redemption and Supreme Military Councils’ 7 years, and President Hila Liman and his PNP, 2 years.

This summary gives us a total of 63 years that equates to our independence from Great Britain 63 years ago (1957 to 2020). As a nation, Ghana has not made the requisite progress that would befit an independent country which was supposed to be “capable of running its own affairs” as declared by Nkrumah on Ghana’s attainment of independence on 6th March 1957.

Of the 10 ten administrations listed above, it is only our first administration led by Dr. Kwame Nkrumah and his Convention People’s Party (CPP) that made significant progress in the land within only 9 years (1957 to1966) in governance and which – exponentially, 54 years on – could have developed Ghana to the likes of Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea and Vietnam. Key among Nkrumah’s major developmental achievements are the Hydro-Electric project, creating the model township of Tema, the first of its kind in West Africa then, the introduction of Ghana Airways, Black Star (Shipping) Line, establishment of 2 (two) major Universities, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, University of Cape Coast and several manufacturing establishments under the Ghanaian Industrial Holding Corporation (GIHOC).

Ending the Duopoly in Ghana’s politics

A new wave of political sanitisation must be invoked to stop the continuing duopoly in our political climate by ushering in a serious and reformist political party such as the Progressive People’s Party (PPP) that ranks third in Ghana’s political arena, to contribute its reformist agenda for change so as to broaden Ghana’s horizons towards the achievement of economic growth through full employment to improve the quality of lives and well-being of the citizenry.

We of the PPP do not seek to conform ourselves to the standards of the NDC and NPP. Instead, our agenda for change shall bring with it the eradication of the endemic parochialism, ethnocentrism, and tribal sentiments in the country that by extension, has led to institutionalised corruption that has resulted at the expense of the majority. The creation of a wide gap between the rich and the poor because all our efforts have been undertaken for the purpose of enabling a few persons to enrich themselves at the expense of the poor majority. Plato has intimated that, and I quote “if you do not take an interest in the affairs of your government, then you are doomed to live under the rule of fools”

Manifesto Promises

The NDC/NPP have started spasmodic general election campaigns with snippets of new promises and assurances ahead of publishing their manifestos. In our usual excitement, we have consistently overlooked to hold our governments accountable for previous manifesto promises that won them votes to govern us in the first place. Traditionally, those manifestos get undelivered, but our society easily let bygones become bygones and start on a clean slate because the old and bigger political parties have tested the nerves of the Ghanaian voter who “gives all to God” and rather focuses on the forthcoming general election.

This time we must punish the sycophants by voting against them. Ghana has endured failed and undeliverable Manifesto assurances by both NPP and NDC for 28 (twenty-eight) years in this fourth republic and the political parties have gotten away unpunished with many unfulfilled promises. PPP believes in under-promising and over-delivering of manifesto assurances. Surely, that is the way forward for yet our under-developed country for all those years that we have gained political independence.

The time is apt to sponsor the introduction of a Legislative Instrument in Parliament to oblige incumbent governments to report to the nation on their manifesto promises as to delivery and non -delivery by the end of September in each election year, listing out the promises that have been fully delivered and those that have not been delivered and the reasons for non-delivery? That way, future manifesto promises shall be made with reasonable caution in the best interests of the nation and that would be the only way to put our shoulders on the wheels on our path to development.

Continuation of uncompleted projects by previous administrations

Prior to 2016 general elections, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, the then NPP Presidential candidate assured the people of Ghana that his government, God-willing, from January 2017, will not abandon any project on the basis that “it was started by a political opponent.” As assuring as it was then in 2016, so shall we expect this undertaking to be honoured during NPP’s tenure of office. However, in the interest of our nation it would only be fair for us to consider sponsoring a Legislative Instrument (as indicated above) to oblige future governments to continue and finish uncompleted projects inherited from previous administrations before embarking on new projects.

Legislation against False and undeliverable Campaign Promises

The trend whereby political parties of over-promise and under-deliver their own manifesto promises has gone on for an awful long time and running up to 2020 elections, the Progressive People’s Party is drawing attention to this debacle and calling on the people of Ghana to stand firm with us to promulgate the legislative instrument necessary to bring to an end the despicable practice whereby we support dishonest political parties that habitually cheat the nation and get away with it just because no one calls them to order. This time I am appealing to all political parties to subject themselves to “manifesto scrutiny” for our country to move ahead. Included in NPP’s 2016 manifesto promises to deliver one district, one factory and one village, one dam and guaranteeing $1miilion dollars for every district in the country among others was instrumental in getting the NPP elected to serve the nation. Even non-NPP folks voted for the NPP and that is why they won by a whopping 1 million votes. We therefore expect these 2016 manifesto promises to be delivered without excuses if our country should proceed to the “promised land” of economic emancipation.

Equal Opportunities for political parties in media platforms

As we prepare to mount the campaign trail, it is necessary for all political parties to be given equal media platforms, including pro-political party media houses, to deliver their messages to the people. The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) must do away with their criteria for Presidential candidates taking part in their debates provided they have representation in parliament. In the case of my Party that is comparatively new; just 8 years old and working hard to win parliamentary seats this requirement disenfranchises us.

Service to Ghana must be paramount above all things and not satisfying IEA’s rule that is discriminatory. I am therefore calling on them (IEA) to reconsider including prospective Presidential candidates who have no representation in our parliament to take part in the debates. This stance of the Institute has the tendency of eliminating the otherwise much more credible candidates to lead our country into the future.

Time to Change direction

NDC and NPP have ruled our country for 42 (forty-two) years and we have not achieved much progress for these years by these two political parties, aside from performance evaluation and unnecessary comparisons between themselves as there is no third party to call them to order. There must be a change in direction by the electorate voting for Progressive Peoples’ Party (PPP) parliamentary candidates at the next general elections to ensure that there is a mouthpiece for the majority poorer in our society. Ghana deserves better with the massive mineral resources at our disposal. A few people in high positions within our governments, past and present are enriching themselves at the expense of the poor souls who vote them into governance.

As ex-President Kufuor once said, and on quote, “consider your situation before casting your vote”. May this wise saying guide us in our journey to the next general elections on 7th December 2020 to free our nation from oppressor’s rule.

Kit Yawson

Chairman

PPP UK & Ireland

London

Email: kitconvention@gmail.com

Nduom Slams GFA For Cancelling League

Dr. Papa Kwesi Nduom, the president and founder of Premier League side, Elmina Sharks, has slammed the Ghana Football Association (GFA) for terminating the 2019/20 football season without recourse to the club owners.

According to him the local football governing body had no locus to cancel the league without consulting the club owners and wondered why such a unilateral decision could be taken when the GFA was merely an administrative body.

“Who is this that is cancelling this league, and who is this that is considering the financial and the health impact of all of this?” he inquired during an interview with UK-based GN Radio and Channel 7 TV.

He noted that the FA should have contacted him first as a club owner before taking such a decision, but he was not involved during the decision-making, a practice he condemned.

“It is not the club owners, and strange enough in Ghana, it is not the club owners who are calling for the cancellation, and nobody called me as a club owner to ask me what is my opinion to be done.”

According to the businessman, football administrators were put in their positions by the clubs and do not invest anything into the game, and as such should not assume so much power to decide what should be done at any given time.

“We have people they’re calling as football administrators; a football administrator doesn’t have a penny or a pesewa in the game. Somebody who is elected by people we have employed to work for us cannot tell me, and shouldn’t be put in a position to tell me what I should and should not do,” he said.

Dr Ndoum, who was also the Presidential candidate for the Progressive People’s Party (PPP) during the 2016 general elections, also stated that the clubs were a private entity and knew how to run their business but it appeared government was interfering with their affairs this time around.

“It should not be up to government to tell a private enterprise what to do, except what the government is telling everybody else what to do.

 “It is about time that the people who have invested in football as private enterprises that we are should be the ones calling for the cancellation of football in Ghana, and that a league should be there that is owned, managed and controlled by those who have invested in football in Ghana.

“This is what happens in the UK and those administrators they’ve hired, they come and go, but it is the owners who make the decisions,” he noted.

“Owners of the big clubs in the English Premier League get together and they have a strong affiliation to help each other in terms of commercial, there’s nothing that stops Ghana from doing that same financial considerations.

“It is the owners who should have sat down to decide [whether] we can handle it this way or not, but nobody talked to us. I hear that there was a call among the managers of the teams but the managers that I have recruited and I pay cannot go and make decisions for me”, he stated.

Credit: GRAPHIC.COM

Prioritize The Health Of Ghanaians Over Elections – Nduom

The Founder of the Progressive People’s Party, Dr. Papa Kwesi Nduom, has urged the government to prioritise the health of citizens over the need to conduct elections amid the threat of COVID-19.

Dr. Nduom noted that the December polls are essential to Ghana’s democracy but not at the expense of human lives.

“An election is something that if necessary, we can do without but we cannot do without the human being in Ghana,” he noted in an interview on GN Radio in the UK.

“What will profit anybody to do well in an election and find out that all the people are sick or the people are not doing well and businesses are collapsing and so on and so forth.”

“So we must first take care of the health of the people,” Dr. Nduom stressed

Ghana as of July 5, 2020 had recorded 20,085 cases of COVID-19 with 122 fatalities.

In addition, 14,870 persons have been discharged after treatment.

The Greater Accra Region has the most cases with 10,979, out of which 2,501 are active.

The ongoing voter registration exercise has been a point of contention with observers warning it will contribute to a spike in cases of the virus.

Some health professionals in the country have written to the Electoral Commission asking it to pause the ongoing voter registration exercise until safer ways of conducting the exercise are identified to prevent further spread of COVID-19.

According to them, suspending the exercise will help prevent needless deaths related to the virus in the country.

“Pause the mass registration, figure out safer ways of carrying it out and prevent Ghana from suffering potentially thousands of deaths or continue with the exercise in this form and be remembered by posterity as a leader who supervised an exercise that allowed for the loss of multiple lives,” the group said in its letter to the commission.

Source: CITI NEWSROOM

7 practical things to remember if you’re suffering from coronavirus health anxiety

Coronavirus has catapulted the world into completely unchartered territory, and it’s scary times for all. With the UK government recommending social distancing, encouraging the whole population to avoid busy social places such as pubs, clubs, restaurants, and theatres, we’re facing a long road ahead of… well, not a lot.

And in that empty space, anxiety can manifest. Whether you’re someone who has long suffered from health anxiety, or if these are new feelings for you, it’s important to find coping mechanisms that help to calm you.

With that in mind, we asked GP Dr Adwoa Danso to share some useful, practical things to remember in these worrying times. If you find yourself spiralling, read through these pointers slowly, and remember that you are certainly not the only one experiencing this kind of fear.

1. Remember that it will pass

“The COVID-19 situation is changing rapidly but it is important to remember that the outbreak will pass,” says Dr Danso. “The majority of people will be unaffected or have mild symptoms which they will completely recover from.”

2. Be aware of the symptoms of stress

“And address them quickly by seeking help from your GP,” advises the doctor. Symptoms of stress can include “overindulging in alcohol and tobacco, having difficulty concentrating, and having a poor sleep pattern”.

3. Focus on the facts

This is a particularly important one, especially with social media facilitating all sorts of information flying about. “Not everyone is an expert,” reminds Dr Danso. “Use reputable sources such as WHO and Public Health England for your information.”ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

4. Talk

“Speaking to people you trust about any concerns helps a lot,” advises the GP. If your friends and family aren’t in the same household as you, utilise the extensive technology we’ve got at our disposal and have regular calls and FaceTimes.

5. Continue taking any prescribed medication from your GP

“Have a plan to obtain your medication if you are to self- isolate, to ensure you do not run out of medication,” reminds the doctor.

Antidepressants, mental health, medication

GRACE CARYGETTY IMAGE

6. Try to avoid feeling claustrophobic

During times of self-isolation and social distancing, it’s natural that the four walls around you might feel as though they’re closing in. “If you’re feeling cooped up, focus on hobbies you can do more of, such as cooking, reading and yoga,” suggests Dr Danso. What better time to crack into that 1,000 piece puzzle…

7. Focus on things you CAN do

Which are: “Follow medical advice, wash your hands and use sanitisers regularly, and avoid non-essential travel.”

Coronavirus, health anxiety

DELMAINE DONSONGETTY IMAGES


The information in this story is accurate as of the publication date. While we are attempting to keep our content as up-to-date as possible, the situation surrounding the coronavirus pandemic continues to develop rapidly, so it’s possible that some information and recommendations may have changed since publishing. For any concerns and latest advice, visit the World Health Organisation. If you’re in the UK, the National Health Service can also provide useful information and support, while US users can contact the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr Adwoa Danso is finding new ways to reach communities where some health topics are taboo

Profile – Dr Adwoa Danso

Roles – Full-time locum GP in Essex and east London; resident doctor on GN Radio UK, including as host of The Medical Show with Dr Danso; founder of The Clinic Diaries online platform; executive at the Ghanaian Doctors and Dentists Association UK (GDDA UK)

Hours worked – Eight to 10 NHS sessions and additional work

Saturday

I’m filming a women’s health series for The Clinic Diaries, my YouTube channel. It’s good to vary themes – this one follows the success of a male-focused series. Other episodes have covered pregnancy, contraception and the impact of social media on mental health.

We film at my home (it’s more relaxed that way), joined by family and friends or special guests such as activists or other healthcare professionals.

The group format enables everyone to share a variety of views. Our audience is mainly black and minority ethnic women, and we discuss issues affecting them and women in general, such as the pressure to have children, and a recent report stating black women are more likely than white women to die during childbirth.

Afterwards, I oversee my producer Sarah in editing the footage, before we release the episodes on YouTube.

Sunday

Weekdays are largely taken up with clinical sessions, so I use Sundays to prepare for my weekly radio show for the Ghanaian community in the UK – typically by reading the newest medical guidelines and the healthcare sections of newspapers – plus Pulse, of course.

I decide the topic the week before, and tell listeners in advance. This time, I’m focusing on menstrual problems. Next is chronic kidney disease. I generally choose issues common in this community; we have covered malaria treatment, hypertension and fertility concerns.

Unfortunately, many medical subjects are taboo in Ghanaian culture, mainly because of deep-rooted spiritual beliefs. This can make it difficult for people to seek help, so I’m proud of how the radio show helps to tackle these barriers.

My co-host, Stanley, is a pro at facilitating discourse. As he doesn’t have a medical background, I brief him with basic clinical information. His lay input brings a fresh perspective, raising points that audiences might be curious about.

Monday

In the evening, I have a conference call with the other executives at the Ghanaian Doctors and Dentists Association UK.

We’re organising our annual conference and gala, which will be fundraising for obstetric fistula support in Ghana. There are plenty of details to consider, from sending VIP invitations to selling raffle tickets.

Tuesday AM

Tuesday is the highlight of every week. After a busy surgery, I head to the GN Radio headquarters in Oval, south London for the weekly show.

I get there early to catch up on local news, checking for anything that is timely for our listeners, who are mostly of Ghanaian origin. Stanley is on hand again, setting up cameras to stream the show to Facebook. This is a key part of our engagement, allowing listeners to submit questions while we’re on air.

Tuesday PM

Before long, we are broadcasting. Our topic is the impact of heavy periods on a woman’s life and there’s plenty to discuss – sick days off work, relationship problems, period poverty and being ostracised by some communities.

I ask how much a pack of sanitary towels costs in Ghana. A Facebook user quickly responds: it’s 6 cedis – roughly £1. For context, the Ghanaian living wage is 900 cedis per month – around £135.

I aim to advise on the issues we explore but stress that, despite hosting a medical show, I’m not a replacement for listeners’ own GPs, and won’t offer personal advice. They’re generally respectful of this, and are always engaging and keen to discover more. One enquires about the Mirena coil – how it’s fitted, whether the process is painful and the estimated recovery time. Another wants me to debunk myths about fibroidectomy. I try to answer all questions, then recap the key points for those who tune in late.

Towards the end, I reiterate that more information can be found on my social media accounts – @ClinicDiaries on Twitter and TheClinicDiaries on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. Tuesday evenings whiz by, and I’m always left inspired after a productive show.

Throughout the week, I keep an eye out for queries or specific areas to pay attention to, ready to do it all over again.

Source:http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/

LIFESTYLE: 15 simple romantic gestures that truly say ‘I love you’

Sometimes, simply saying “I love you” is not enough.

It doesn’t always take a grandiose declaration of love to get your message across. Most of the time, it’s those little somethings and sweet nothings that help you stay connected for the long haul.

Need romantic ideas? The 15 romantic gestures below are just a few examples of everyday actions that mean the world to someone you’re in love with. You can learn how to be romantic by doing just a few of these, and showing your partner you care.

1. Help whittle down their to-do list.
Pick up her dry cleaning, stock his fridge with a week’s worth of groceries, clean her bathroom, frame the poster that’s been sitting in the corner of his living room since you met. After all, it’s tough to be romantic with all those tasks hanging over your head.

2. Slip a sweet note into their gym bag.
What better workout motivation is there than a reminder of how much you care?

3. Make them feel at home.
If you and your significant other live apart, make an effort to stock your place with specific items — food, shampoo, etc. — that he or she likes. It makes your place feel more like home.

4. Send a postcard or love letter in the mail.
Emails are easy come, easy go. Snail mail packs a punch, especially when it’s not a bill.

5. Share your feelings through music.
Make them a sweet mixtape or playlist of songs that make you crazy about them!

6. Make breakfast.
It doesn’t have to be in bed. It doesn’t even have to be anything fancy. Heart-shaped pancakes are easy!

7. Recreate your first date.
Go to the same place, order the same drinks, and so on. Reminisce about your first impressions of your partner and some of the best, most exciting things that have happened in your relationship since then.

8. Display a sentimental snapshot.
Instead of keeping an awesome photo of the two of you on your phone or Facebook wall, print a copy and frame it. Put it somewhere your partner will see it every day.

9. Make the bed.
After you spend the night together, tuck the sheets in, fluff the pillows, and make it extra neat so it’s relaxing to get back into later.

10. Help simplify their day.
Maybe he’s been using the same broken umbrella for a year, or she’s always misplacing her keys. Buy something to solve this little problem, like a top-of-the-line umbrella in his favorite color or a keychain that beeps when she whistles for it.

11. Suggest doing something they want to do.
Think of a restaurant, outing, movie — something that you know is right up his alley — and suggest it before he or she can bring it up.

12. Compliment them in front of other people.
It doesn’t just feel good for both of you — it also inspires other people.

13. Hold hands.
Even if you’re just watching TV at home. Touch is an easy and powerful gift you can give almost anywhere, in various stages of dress.

14. Make a list.
Post a list of three things you love about her on her Facebook wall, or send it out into the Twittersphere.

15. Make a vow to always greet each other in a loving way.
This is especially important after you’ve been apart. Even if it feels a little silly at first, it’ll help you and your partner keep the butterflies alive.